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Self-Care

Sleeping On the Job


To fight fatigue and increase productivity, the NSF says some businesses, in conjunction with wellness providers, are establishing onsite nap rooms, complete with reclining chairs, blankets and alarm clocks. Companies that encourage napping, such as Yarde Metals in Bristol, Conn., report that a midday nap reduces accidents and errors and increases productivity.

The NSF says 27 percent of the domestic work force is drowsy on the job one or more days each week; although the lack of sleep has a significant effect on job performance, there are still very few places of business that allow employees to take naps, the foundation reports.

Van Davis, Baylor University Fitness Coordinator, said a few small activities can help wellness clients increase their caloric expenditure, thereby allowing them to lose weight, relieve stress and, most importantly, increase stamina and combat drowsiness. Davis said clients should:

* Park their cars at the back of the parking lot instead of the front row.

* Use stairs instead of the elevator.

* Walk to a co-worker’s desk instead of telephoning or sending an e-mail.

* Take a walk break around the work place instead of a coffee break.

* Do chair stretches.

* Keep a water bottle at their desks and drink from it often throughout the day (and refill it often).

* Use at least the first and last five minutes of lunch breaks for fitness walks.

* Take longer routes to the restroom or to get coffee.

Address: National Sleep Foundation, 729 15th St. NW, Washington, DC 20005; (202) 347-3471, www.sleepfoundation.org.

Copyright 2002 Health Resources Publishing


© 2002 Health Resources Publishing