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Nutrition

Essentials for Successful Nutrition Changes


Feeling overwhelmed by the amount of nutrition information out there? You're not alone.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found that consumers felt confused by the amount of nutrition information they are exposed to, much of which seems contradictory.

And, just because you've read some brochures about the subject, doesn't mean healthy eating is guaranteed.

"Reading alone isn't going to help all individuals make healthy lifestyle changes," explained Diane Fulton, nutritionist with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Child and Adult Care Food Program. "Many people know the facts, yet still don't make changes.

"Achieving a healthy lifestyle requires changing unhealthy habits," said Fulton.

Here are several tips to keep in mind before you try to make those changes:

Be Realistic. Make small changes over time in what is eaten and in the level of activity.

Be Adventurous. Expand tastes to include new foods and try a variety of different sports and activities. Try a new fruit or vegetable each week, or learn a new dance or walk a new route.

Be Flexible. Balance what is eaten and the level of activity over several days. Don't worry if one meal or one day's activities aren't up to par.

Be sensible. Enjoy all foods. Just don't overdo it. After splurging on a special occasion lunch, go for an extra long walk or eat a salad for dinner.

Be Active. Walk the dog; don't just watch the dog walk. Find ways to add activity to daily routines. Park the car at the far end of the parking lot. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Go for a bike ride with the children.

Address: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver, CO 80222; (303) 692-2000.


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