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Nutrition

Clinical Studies Assess the Impact of Honey Supplements on Exercise Performance and Recovery


The National Honey Board, in cooperation with IMAGINutrition and MetaResponse Sciences, is funding two clinical trials at the Exercise and Sports Nutrition Laboratory at the University of Memphis to determine if honey really is more than just a sweet treat.

"The trials are centering on the value of honey during exercise performance and recovery in endurance and weight training individuals," said Rick Kreider, Ph.D., lead investigator for honey study.

In support of the study on honey, numerous clinical trials have indicated the ingestion of carbohydrates during exercise can enhance exercise performance. The unique carbohydrate profile of honey may favorably alter the way the body burns fuel during exercise. Recent evidence also indicates concurrent carbohydrate and protein ingestion prior to and/or following exercise may reduce exercise-induced muscle protein breakdown and be beneficial for all athletes involved in intense training.

"If honey fosters a more favorable hormone profile than typical carbohydrates, this could lead to quicker recuperation after exercise," suggests Dr. Kreider.

Although often overlooked as a dietary supplement, honey is a naturally occurring combination of various sugars and antioxidants in a gel form. Recently, the consumption of carbohydrates in a gel form has become a popular means for athletes to ingest carbohydrates prior to, during and/or following exercise.

For more information contact IMAGINutrition and MetaResponse Sciences at http://www.nusciences.com.


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